Foster Granparents · Foster Parenting · Uncategorized

A Foster Grandparent’s Heart Laid Bare

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The conversation starts out simply, asking questions that women are prone to ask –

Are your children married?

Yes.

Do you have grandchildren?

Yes! Two grandsons that my daughter and son-in-law are fostering to adopt.

Oh.

The last, “Oh” echos in the room like a shout in a canyon, and is spoken with a disappointed tone, as if to say,

Oh, I’m sorry you don’t have REAL grandchildren.

Continue reading “A Foster Grandparent’s Heart Laid Bare”

friends · Mentoring · obedience

Endurance of a Counselor

Image result for pioneer club sewing badge

I have the joy of teaching first and second graders in our church Pioneer Club on Wednesday nights.  In this children’s ministry, each club works for badges by learning Bible verses and different skills.  This month I’m teaching them to sew two kinds of simple stitches.  While it’s hard to tell them they have to pull out the stitches they worked so hard on because they’re wrong, they would never learn if I let them go on with their own way of doing it. So, we rip out and they do it again with help from workers.

Have you ever watched someone you knew and cared for slip away from the Lord? It’s even more heart wrenching than a 7 year-old who has to redo a task.  Out of a desire to help, someone steps in – maybe it was you – and tries to give godly counsel. The one going astray is guided to God’s Word but they continue a downward spiral, avoiding the Bible, church, and anyone who points them to God. The frustrated counselor might want to say, “Fine, go your way. You will reap from what you’re sowing! I’m washing my hands of this.”

As we read I Samuel 15 we see how Samuel responded to hearing that Saul had not obeyed the Lord. It says in verse11 –  

“And it grieved Samuel; and he cried unto the Lord all night.” 

His heart was broken for Saul. Samuel had given Saul much instruction, but spite that, Saul chose to go his own way and disobey the Lord’s commands. In verse 35 we read,

“Samuel came no more to see Saul until the day of his death: nevertheless, Samuel mourned for Saul…” 

 Samuel wasn’t afraid to share the truth with Saul; a reminder, I believe, that we don’t just sit and watch someone sin and be afraid to tell them the truth in love. But we must remain broken over their sin. I believe that Samuel continued to pray for Saul, and even though he watched Saul slipping farther and farther away, he loved him and desired that Saul make things right with the Lord.

If there’s someone you know that has drifted – perhaps a friend, or even a child or family member, ask the Lord to keep your heart soft towards them, as modeled by godly Samuel. May our hearts be as such as would mourn and cry to the Lord all night for a brother or sister that has wandered. Keep praying and lovingly sharing the truth when you have the opportunity. God desires that they return to Him, and it might be due to a Christian friend like you that they will do just that.

I can’t wait to see my club members get their sewing badge at the end of the month! Let’s care enough to share the truth with that one who isn’t walking with God, then stick around to see the results; it will be worth it!

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Christian love · Love

Looking For a Bandaged Finger

Image result for band aidDwight Marrow, the father of Anne Morrow Lindbergh, once held a dinner party to which Calvin Coolidge had been invited. After Coolidge left, Morrow told the remaining guests that Coolidge would make a good president. The others disagreed. They felt Coolidge was too quiet, that he lacked color and personality. No one would like him, they said. Anne, then age six, spoke up: “I like him,” she said. Then she displayed a finger with a small bandage around it.

“He was the only one at the party who asked about my sore finger. “

Showing a bit of compassion to a person makes a huge difference! Jude 22 says, “And of some having compassion, making a difference.” While we understand that this verse is speaking about using compassion to bring back those that have gone astray in apostasy, it has challenged my heart as to how all ministry is to be done, if it’s to accomplish what the Lord would desire.

There are two ways to do ministry – in the flesh and in the Spirit. When we serve the Lord in the Spirit we will respond in compassionate ways to the needs around us.
Would you really want an uncaring nurse to administer your shots to you?
Would you appreciate your hostess responding to you in a hostile manner when she learns you have some dietary restrictions?
Would you want to be greeted by a cold, unfeeling church member when you’re in the midst of a trial?

We are given a wonderful example of compassion in Acts 9. The character is Dorcas, a follower of Christ’s. She was known by the good works she had done for the widows. After she fell sick and died, the women mourned her death so much that they sent for Peter. Surely he could do something for her! Here’s a lesson in itself. What will others say when you and I die? Would we be missed so much that others would pray for our resurrection? Would our absence in our home, church, and community leave a void? We are each preaching our funeral while we live!

When Peter arrived they spread out the coats and garments that Dorcas had made for them; this was the demonstration of her compassion for these widows. If all our compassionate efforts were spread out in front of others what would we have to show?

  • Would there be evidence that we cared, that we:
    • took time to provide a meal for someone?
    • That we had graciously spent time writing a note of encouragement to someone in the midst of a difficulty?

It’s so easy to get caught up in our own little world that we miss out on opportunities to show compassion. Dorcas made the Gospel believable by her acts of mercy, coupled with a heart that moved her efforts along like the current of a waterfall. Her life was constantly pouring out good works. We know that these works don’t save a person. We could never do enough good to pay the ransom for our soul. Christ did that on the cross. Our works, however, show that our faith is not dead (James 2:26b).

There are many opportunities for us to link arms and show compassion. We can encourage each other  first in our individual homes (sometimes the easiest place to neglect). Our efforts should then run to the church and then our community.

Be alert to the opportunities that the Lord brings your way. Someone out there has a “bandaged finger”; let’s find them and minister to them, and in so doing make the Gospel believable!

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