Comfort Food · Dinner

When You Can’t Go Out For Pizza

I have always loved a good Pan Pizza from Pizza Hut!  That thick crust that is golden and crispy is all I care about.  But just when you want a good pizza, you might be afraid to order pick-up for all the reasons that everyone in the world is aware of today.  What to do?  You make King Arthur Flour’s 2020 recipe of the yearwhich just happens to be Crispy cheesy Pan Pizza. 

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The only negative about this recipe is that you have to think ahead!  The crust is made the night before you need it.  But the wonderful thing about his pizza dough is that it is so simple it’s unbelievable!  There is so little hands-on time!  The greatest amount of time is spent in the fridge overnight.

There is a really good reason this is their recipe of the year!  I have some quick pizza recipes that we enjoy, but when I’m hungry for a thick pan pizza, this will be my planned-ahead choice!!

There are lots of steps in the recipe, but that just simplifies exactly what to do so yours will turn out perfectly.  They didn’t leave any guess work!  I would suggest that you mix up the dough and do these first five steps after dinner the day before you will bake it.  You don’t want to wait too late in the night to mix it because you have to do little dough turns four times every five minutes, then it needs to sit out 40 minutes before you tuck it into the fridge for the night.  BUT IT’S SO EASY!

The only thing I added to my pizza was the red onion.  Otherwise, I followed their recipe exactly and it was fabulous!

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Here’s the recipe from King Arthur’s site:

Crispy Cheesy Pan Pizza 

Ingredients

Crust

  • 2 cups (240g) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast or active dry yeast
  • 3/4 cup (170g) lukewarm water
  • 1 tablespoon (13g) olive oil + 1 1/2 tablespoons (18g) olive oil for the pan

Topping

  • 6 ounces (170g) mozzarella, grated (about 1 1/4 cups, loosely packed)*
  • 1/3 to 1/2 cup (74g to 113g) tomato sauce or pizza sauce, homemade or store-bought
  • freshly grated hard cheese and fresh herbs for sprinkling on top after baking, optional*
  1. Weigh your flour; or measure it by gently spooning it into a cup, then sweeping off any excess.

  2. Place the flour, salt, yeast, water, and 1 tablespoon (13g) of the olive oil in the bowl of a stand mixer or other medium-large mixing bowl.

  3. Stir everything together to make a shaggy, sticky mass of dough with no dry patches of flour. This should take 30 to 45 seconds in a mixer using the beater paddle; or about 1 minute by hand, using a spoon or spatula. Scrape down the sides of the bowl to gather the dough into a rough ball; cover the bowl.

  4. After 5 minutes, uncover the bowl and reach a bowl scraper or your wet hand down between the side of the bowl and the dough, as though you were going to lift the dough out. Instead of lifting, stretch the bottom of the dough up and over its top. Repeat three more times, turning the bowl 90° each time. This process of four stretches, which takes the place of kneading, is called a fold.
  5. Re-cover the bowl, and after 5 minutes do another fold. Wait 5 minutes and repeat; then another 5 minutes, and do a fourth and final fold. Cover the bowl and let the dough rest, undisturbed, for 40 minutes. Then refrigerate it for a minimum of 12 hours, or up to 72 hours. It’ll rise slowly as it chills, developing flavor; this long rise will also add flexibility to your schedule.

  6. About 3 hours before you want to serve your pizza, prepare your pan. Pour 1 1/2 tablespoons (18g) olive oil into a well-seasoned cast iron skillet that’s 10” to 11” diameter across the top, and about 9” across the bottom. Heavy, dark cast iron will give you a superb crust; but if you don’t have it, use another oven-safe heavy-bottomed skillet of similar size, or a 10” round cake pan or 9” square pan. Tilt the pan to spread the oil across the bottom, and use your fingers or a paper towel to spread some oil up the edges, as well.

  7. Transfer the dough to the pan and turn it once to coat both sides with the oil. After coating the dough in oil, press the dough to the edges of the pan, dimpling it using the tips of your fingers in the process. The dough may start to resist and shrink back; that’s OK, just cover it and let it rest for about 15 minutes, then repeat the dimpling/pressing. At this point the dough should reach the edges of the pan; if it doesn’t, give it one more 15-minute rest before dimpling/pressing a third and final time.

  8. Cover the crust and let it rise for 2 hours at room temperature. The fully risen dough will look soft and pillowy and will jiggle when you gently shake the pan.
  9. About 30 minutes before baking, place one rack at the bottom of the oven and one toward the top (about 4″ to 5″ from the top heating element). Preheat the oven to 450°F.

  10. When you’re ready to bake the pizza, sprinkle about three-quarters of the mozzarella (a scant 1 cup) evenly over the crust. Cover the entire crust, no bare dough showing; this will yield caramelized edges. Dollop small spoonfuls of the sauce over the cheese; laying the cheese down first like this will prevent the sauce from seeping into the crust and making it soggy. Sprinkle on the remaining mozzarella.

  11. Bake the pizza on the bottom rack of the oven for 18 to 20 minutes, until the cheese is bubbling and the bottom and edges of the crust are a rich golden brown (use a spatula to check the bottom). If the bottom is brown but the top still seems pale, transfer the pizza to the top rack and bake for 2 to 4 minutes longer. On the other hand, if the top seems fine but the bottom’s not browned to your liking, leave the pizza on the bottom rack for another 2 to 4 minutes. Home ovens can vary a lot, so use the visual cues and your own preferences to gauge when you’ve achieved the perfect bake.

  12. Remove the pizza from the oven and place the pan on a heatproof surface. Carefully run a table knife or spatula between the edge of the pizza and side of the pan to prevent the cheese from sticking as it cools. Let the pizza cool very briefly; as soon as you feel comfortable doing so, carefully transfer it from the pan to a cooling rack or cutting surface. This will prevent the crust from becoming soggy.

  13. Serve the pizza anywhere from medium-hot to warm. Kitchen shears or a large pair of household scissors are both good tools for cutting this thick pizza into wedges.

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If you love a good pan pizza, don’t be disappointed about not being able to go out!  This recipe just might keep you from ever going back to your favorite place!!

What’s your favorite part of a pizza?  The crust or the toppings?

Enjoy!

denise a

12 thoughts on “When You Can’t Go Out For Pizza

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